Very very very old spectroheliograms

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Wah
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Very very very old spectroheliograms

Post by Wah » Tue Feb 17, 2015 4:30 am

Last edited by Wah on Tue Feb 17, 2015 5:36 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Very very very old spectroheliographs

Post by swisswalter » Tue Feb 17, 2015 5:21 am

Hi Wah

thanks for digging that out
Only stardust in the wind, some fine and some less fine scopes, filters and adapters as well. Switzerland 47 N, 9 E, in the heart of EUROPE :)

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Re: Very very very old spectroheliographs

Post by Merlin66 » Tue Feb 17, 2015 5:31 am

Thanks for that Wah!
It shows dramatically how the advent of the digital SHG is capable of producing results only dreamed about by the professionals a few years ago.
"Astronomical Spectroscopy - The Final Frontier" - to boldly go where few amateurs have gone before
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/ast ... scopy/info
"Astronomical Spectroscopy for Amateurs" and
"Imaging Sunlight - using a digital spectroheliograph" - Springer

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Re: Very very very old spectroheliograms

Post by marktownley » Tue Feb 17, 2015 8:17 am

Way cool! Interesting to see how things have moved on.
Image
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Re: Very very very old spectroheliograms

Post by Derek Klepp » Tue Feb 17, 2015 9:45 am

Thanks Wah

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Re: Very very very old spectroheliograms

Post by Montana » Tue Feb 17, 2015 10:11 am

Wow! I think they are pretty impressive for 1893 :bow :bow :bow

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Re: Very very very old spectroheliograms

Post by Merlin66 » Tue Feb 17, 2015 11:09 pm

These were taken using the Deslandres spectroheliograph...a slightly different design from the Hale version...
I believe the first Ha spectroheliogram wasn't taken until 1909. (the early photographic plates being more sensitive in the blue, and had to wait until further panochromatic plates became available around 1902.)
Last edited by Merlin66 on Tue Feb 17, 2015 11:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: spelling!
"Astronomical Spectroscopy - The Final Frontier" - to boldly go where few amateurs have gone before
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/ast ... scopy/info
"Astronomical Spectroscopy for Amateurs" and
"Imaging Sunlight - using a digital spectroheliograph" - Springer

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Re: Very very very old spectroheliograms

Post by Wah » Wed Feb 18, 2015 1:21 am

What is Deslandres or Hale spectroheliograph?
Can you give me some more details?

I have found the earilest Ha images in the link above was 1908, it's after 1902.
http://bass2000.obspm.fr/gallery2/main. ... temId=9764

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Re: Very very very old spectroheliograms

Post by Merlin66 » Wed Feb 18, 2015 9:42 pm

Wah,
Hale describes his instrument in:
http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1929CMWCI.388....1H
There's a brief description of Deslandres one on the Meudon Site
http://www.obspm.fr/the-meudon-spectroh ... ml?lang=en
Hale also wrote an article on the SHG and SHS in ATM, Book one, p 180-214
"Astronomical Spectroscopy - The Final Frontier" - to boldly go where few amateurs have gone before
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/ast ... scopy/info
"Astronomical Spectroscopy for Amateurs" and
"Imaging Sunlight - using a digital spectroheliograph" - Springer

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Re: Very very very old spectroheliograms

Post by highfnum » Sat Feb 21, 2015 6:39 pm

wow nice find - thx
images not that bad from so long ago

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Spectral Joe
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Re: Very very very old spectroheliograms

Post by Spectral Joe » Sun Mar 01, 2015 9:27 pm

Here's one from 1892, from Hale's Kenwood spectroheliograph.
Kenwood K spectroheliogram 1892.jpg
Kenwood K spectroheliogram 1892.jpg (58.67 KiB) Viewed 1568 times
The instrument it came from looked like this:
Kenwood spectroheliograph.jpg
He used this instrument from 1892 until 1895,when it, with the rest of Kenwood Observatory, became part of Yerkes Observatory. The white hoses are for a hydraulic drive (klepshydra, or water clock) that drove the entrance and exit slits using the linkages that can be seen. After 1903 he used the Rumford spectroheliograph:
Rumford spectroheliograph.jpg
Rumford spectroheliograph.jpg (15.78 KiB) Viewed 1568 times
This was built specifically for the 40 inch refractor, and scanned in declination with the RA drive running as normal. In 1904 Hale moved his operation to Mount Wilson, supposedly temporarily but ultimately permanently. The spectrohelioscope, described in the 1929 paper, was developed by Hale in 1923 as a pet project in his health related early retirement from the directorship of Mount Wilson. He described it in a 1924 paper,and later in a series of articles popularizing the instrument. Many variants have followed.
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Re: Very very very old spectroheliograms

Post by Merlin66 » Sun Mar 01, 2015 9:33 pm

Joe,
Thanks for that.
I did manage to find similar illustrations and the Hale references.
Also, prior to the introduction of red sensitive film (around 1903) Hale did some spectroheliograms in Hb.....
"Astronomical Spectroscopy - The Final Frontier" - to boldly go where few amateurs have gone before
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/ast ... scopy/info
"Astronomical Spectroscopy for Amateurs" and
"Imaging Sunlight - using a digital spectroheliograph" - Springer

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Re: Very very very old spectroheliograms

Post by Spectral Joe » Sun Mar 01, 2015 9:58 pm

Mount Wilson's first documented Ha work was in March, 1908, as shown in this snip from the 1908 annual report:
MWO 1908 report snip.PNG
MWO 1908 report snip.PNG (73.67 KiB) Viewed 1567 times
On page 204 of the 1912 annual report there is an interesting statement on their investigation into the state of the art in sensitizing plates, and the non scientific nature of the process. I recently got to see the room at Mount Wilson, built into the side of a hill between the Snow and 60 foot tower telescopes, used for special photo chemistry. The underground room had the steady temperature required for the work.
Observing the Sun with complex optical systems since 1966, and still haven't burned, melted or damaged anything.
Not blind yet, either!
Light pollution? I only observe the Sun, magnitude -26.74. Pollute that!

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