Middleschool science class spectrometer recommendation?

I LOVE finding out about different ways to appreciate the Sun and light in general. Use this forum to post your info or questions about various outside the mainstream ways to appreciate our life giving star!
Post Reply
User avatar
Anthony M
Oh, I get it now!
Oh, I get it now!
Posts: 22
Joined: Sat Jan 28, 2017 2:06 am

Middleschool science class spectrometer recommendation?

Post by Anthony M » Wed Feb 15, 2017 1:45 am

Hello,

I'm a middle school science teacher and am interested in getting a spectroscope (oops, not a spectrometer) to accompany my HA scope for showing my students. My budget is tight (the HA scope was the majority of it). Any recommendations on good budget units that will show solar spectral characteristics that students can handle?

Thanks!

-Anthony

ham
The Sun?
The Sun?
Posts: 8
Joined: Thu Nov 20, 2014 11:20 pm
Location: Hong Kong SAR China

Re: Middleschool science class spectrometer recommendation?

Post by ham » Wed Feb 15, 2017 6:13 am

Hi Anthony,

Do you a Diy-er?
You may browse lightfrominfinity.org for getting detail to do this item.

Regards
Ham

User avatar
Montana
Way More Fun to Share It!!
Way More Fun to Share It!!
Posts: 19153
Joined: Mon Oct 17, 2011 5:25 pm
Location: Cheshire, UK

Re: Middleschool science class spectrometer recommendation?

Post by Montana » Wed Feb 15, 2017 12:39 pm

Shelyak are the company to try, I have used these at an astronomy show and they were great! They come in various sizes from very basic to very expensive.
http://www.shelyak.com/?lang=2

I think Stephen 'Mr Solarchat' has a couple for outreach

Alexandra

User avatar
Merlin66
Librarian
Librarian
Posts: 3094
Joined: Tue Dec 13, 2011 1:23 pm
Location: St Leonards, Australia
Contact:

Re: Middleschool science class spectrometer recommendation?

Post by Merlin66 » Thu Feb 16, 2017 12:50 am

A DIY solution is by far the cheapest (and most interesting/ fun!)
I'd recommend something along the simple Classical design using a couple of binocular objectives and an adjustable entrance slit from Surplus Shed.
A 600 l/mm reflection grating from Optometrics, say 30 x 30mm.
With this arrangement and a 12 to 25mm eyepiece the kids will see all the prominent solar absorption lines....you can also add a webcam to project the solar spectrum on the screen......
No telescope needed.
A basic design is shown by Buil:
http://www.astrosurf.com/buil/us/spe2/hresol.htm
Any questions, just ask.
"Astronomical Spectroscopy - The Final Frontier" - to boldly go where few amateurs have gone before
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/ast ... scopy/info
"Astronomical Spectroscopy for Amateurs" and
"Imaging Sunlight - using a digital spectroheliograph" - Springer

User avatar
Anthony M
Oh, I get it now!
Oh, I get it now!
Posts: 22
Joined: Sat Jan 28, 2017 2:06 am

Re: Middleschool science class spectrometer recommendation?

Post by Anthony M » Thu Feb 16, 2017 9:52 am

Thanks all! Will look at these suggestions. I do like DIY- it's a great learning tool as students learn by doing something fun while they are at it.

User avatar
marktownley
Librarian
Librarian
Posts: 23818
Joined: Tue Oct 18, 2011 5:27 pm
Location: Brierley Hills, UK
Contact:

Re: Middleschool science class spectrometer recommendation?

Post by marktownley » Thu Feb 16, 2017 11:34 am

Hi Anthony, I've made a cereal box spectrometer several times now - they work very well for the students.

https://www.google.co.uk/webhp?sourceid ... ectroscope
Image
http://brierleyhillsolar.blogspot.co.uk/
Solar images, a collection of all the most up to date live solar data on the web, imaging & processing tutorials - please take a look!

User avatar
Anthony M
Oh, I get it now!
Oh, I get it now!
Posts: 22
Joined: Sat Jan 28, 2017 2:06 am

Re: Middleschool science class spectrometer recommendation?

Post by Anthony M » Sat Feb 18, 2017 9:06 pm

Thanks again for the great suggestions here guys, we are putting together materials to start out simple first and moving up from there. I asked the class to bring in a few cerial boxes, thinking students could work on it in groups but every student brought their own in and most said their parents got mad when they emptied out the cerial from them. Big oops! Anyways, I am now thoroughly convinced that I solved California's drought problem since I bought my first HA scope a couple weeks ago and now since I've started this spectroscopy project. Where is the Sun? Perhaps we should have tried a solar magnetometry project instead. Cheers, -Anthony

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests